Category Archives: DMH Music

I’ve been excited about surround 5.1 or 7.1 FLAC as a preferred playback and on-line distribution medium for a long time. To me, it simply comes down to ease, convenience, quality and stability. Here’s a straightforward way that I use to produce, distribute and playback my own 5.1 productions using FLAC.

The Production side: (Music production > Add Metadata > Zip included Files > Link to Zip in Doc > Store in the Cloud)

– To start, I do most of my music using Steinberg’s Nuendo. Using Nuendo, it’s super-easy to create your surround mix and then export it as a single 5.1 interleaved FLAC file. I quickly realized that the key to making multi-channel FLAC was to encode your mix as a single multi-channel interleaved stream. Quite often, it’s a good idea to add a second or two at the header, to allow the playback unit to catch the stream.

– Once that’s done, you’re more than half way home. The next step is to add the appropriate metadata to the surround files. For this, I use EZ CD Audio Converter, an excellent program out of an Eastern Block country.

– The next step is to zip the files (along with cover graphic, project booklet and any other media) into a single downloadable file. I personally use Bandcamp to distribute the hi-res surround files (in addition to the ho-res stereo files) as a “Bonus Item”. Although the files themselves can’t be added to the Bonus Item list, I simply add a well-crafted document that can be downloaded that then links to the zipped directory that is stored on my Google Drive … and voila, the customer has the entire project in zipped form.

The Playback side: (Download/unpack the zip > Copy the directory to a disc or dongle > Put it in your media player and press PLAY)

– On the user’s side, the customer buys the project on Bandcamp and downloads/unzips the directory. Here is where the true power of FLAC comes in … the user can simply play the files from his or her computer (I recommend VLC Media Player … it simply rocks at playing all media). Just press play and your sustem should play the files in 5.1 or 7.1 without any problems.

– If you only have a surround home theater system, there should be no problem at all. Either burn the files to a DVD or (better yet) save the plastic and copy the files to a thumb drive. Most modern TVs and media players will accept a thumb drive, whereby you can point to the project from the remote and you’re in surround biz!

Personal note: You’ll notice that I produce in 5.1 instead of 7.1 … and you might ask why? For me, the answer is simple. There are far more 5.1 systems out there than 7.1 systems. My production style is renowned (4X Grammy nominated) for my use of all of the speakers for important content information. Since Flac is discrete and can’t fold-down, if I produced in 7.1, those folks with a 5.1 system would be missing 2 important channels … and I’m not prepared to do that! So, 5.1 it is!

David Miles Huber is a 4X Grammy-nominated producer and musician in the electronic dance and surround-sound genres, whose music has sold over the million mark. His dance performance style is energized and balanced out by lush beats and live acoustic instruments that combine to create a “Zen-meets-Tech Experience”. His latest music and collaborations can be heard at www.davidmileshuber.com and davidmileshuber.bandcamp.com.

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5.1 surround mix

Once the stereo mix was done, it was time to finally take on the 5.1 mixes. After a bit of deliberation, I decided to mix Raven in 5.1 and not 7.1. This was for purely practical reasons. Anyone who knows me knows that I mix my projects using all of the speakers in the soundscape and not just a bit in the center and reverb in the rear. Since the final mixes were to be delivered in discrete 24/96 FLAC form, if I would’ve done a 7.1 mix, people who were listening to it over a 5.1 system would be missing the two side channels. For me, this was unacceptable … so a 5.1 mix it was!

My main speaker set are PMC AML2’s in 5.1 … They’re amazing speakers, however, for years I’ve been fighting what I thought was a lack of hi-end in the front speaker set. Turns out, it wasn’t a lack of highs … it was a lack of low-end that caused me to have to compensate by boosting the highs. Basically, I was fighting the wrong end (try to be aware of this possibility in your system … these sonic lies can really throw you off.

Soooooo … I knew that my buddy Elliot Scheiner has mix a lot of Grammy winning projects on the JBL 306p speakers (which happen to cost around $100 each these days). So I bought a pair and placed them on my mixing desk just under the PMCs. Mixing Haida (Raven) using the JBL’s was a breeze and seemed to fix the low-end cut problem (and thus the need to over compensate in the highs. This led me to insert the JBL’s into the 5.1 chain. At this point, a unique approach had to be taken … turns out that Steinberg offers up an easy solution.

This answer came in the form of a plug-in from Steinberg that lets you insert the plug-in into the monitor output chain to control the level and delay compensation that lets you time-align the speakers sets. I say set because Nuendo let me setup a 5.1 monitor bus for the upper speakers (as per normal), but also let’s me create a second 5.1 setup that inserts the JBL L/Rs instead of the PMC L/Rs. By time delaying the JBLs (that are 50cm closer than the PMCs, the mixstage came into clear focus and I was able to get a really good 5.1 balance mix.

Most of DMH’s music is now available with bonus 5.1 FLAC mixes on Bandcamp. These can be checked out at https://davidmileshuber.bandcamp.com/

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How can I best convey my love for Berlin … Is it the life in almost everyone you see on the streets, is it the fashion lady that sits across from you on the u-bahn with the small grey pug that says “I’m a fashion dog, too, and I don’t care”, is it the older guy totally dressed in white (complete with matching white gloves), is it the sax player that’s wailing on a 1/2 scale sax, is it the guy playing awesome Arabic music on the bagpipes down the street … and so much more that I won’t even go into? It’s not easy being away from Dan, but he knows what this place means to me … and I’m grateful to him for that. Liebe gruss aus Berlin!

Gamma was born out of the concept of representing light through music, specifically those aspects of light that are beyond our ability to perceive. Like so many things in life, not all things of beauty can be readily seen by the naked eye. It’s good to take the time to dig deeper to see what’s behind the facade of what lay before us … the inner, unseen radiance that is all around us. Created and produced in Seattle and Berlin by David Miles Huber (www.davidmileshuber.com), this project guides the listener through space and time, engaging the senses in new and immersive ways.

project info:

Electronic
Chill Out
Alternative

Gamma (Chill Mix)
Uploaded: November 2, 2018
Release date: May 19, 2017

DK UPC: 193537113074

Lumina (Chill Mix)
Spectra (Chill Mix)
Ultraviolet (Chill Mix)
Radiance (Chill Mix)
Chroma (Chill Mix)

ISRC: QZES61869129
ISRC: QZES61869130
ISRC: QZES61869131
ISRC: QZES61869132
ISRC: QZES61869133

Song Credits:

Music: David Miles Huber
Engineer: David Miles Huber
Mastering: David Miles Huber and Emiliano Caballero Fraccaroli
Additional engineer: Emiliano Caballero Fraccaroli
Drums: John Ewing
Recording: Drums recorded at London Bridge Studios, Seattle
Recording: Recorded in Seattle/WA/USA and Berlin/Deutschland
Mixing: Mixed in Seattle/WA/USA and at Galaxy Studios/Mol/Belgium

Thank you:
Daniel Eric Butler (my husband, partner and best friend)
nhow Hotel and the folks at Soundfloor, Berlin
Dominik Trampf, Berlin
Everyone at Galaxy Studios, Mol, Belgium
Steinberg Media Technologies Gmbh (studio DAW – Nuendo)
Ableton AG (performance DAW – Live)
Universal Audio Inc. (powered DAW audio plug-ins)
PMC Speakers (professional studio monitors)
Steven Slate Audio Inc. (touch video monitors)
Zerodebug (TouchAble performance/studio application for the iPad)

tag keywords: David Miles Huber, electronic music, Bandcamp, IDM, uptempo, downtempo, chill, grammy, grammy nominated, modern recording techniques, immersive, surround flac, surround, flac, 5.1, gamers, home theater,

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Haida is –

a thematic concept album. Unlike much of modern music that is meant to be consumed as a short-term aperitif, Haida is an album that was crafted over three decades. It’s meant to be revisited as a voyage, a reminder that we are connected, not only to each other, but to the land, itself. It is the artist’s greatest hope that this project will make it into your personal “desert island” list of music that you can refer back to and gain repeated inspiration and enjoyment from.

Haida is –

a very special project, whose goal is to portray the beauty, majesty and power of the land of the Northwest Territories that stretches from the Puget Sound of Washington State, north to the Queen Charlotte Islands of British Columbia. It is not about the people of these territories, but about the spiritual power of the land itself, portraying its beauty, grandeur and spiritual energy. This “epic project” is designed to transport us to the land of deep waters, soaring eagles, snow-capped mountains and lush forests that is at the heart of the Pacific Northwest and lower western Canada.

Known also by its Haida name “Gwaii Haanas”, meaning islands of wonder, the Queen Charlotte Islands are referred to by some as “awe-inspiring”. An archipelago of more than 150 islands, the Queen Charlotte Islands are located 50 miles west of the Canadian mainland and are widely known for their natural beauty, old totems, longhouses and a thriving native culture.

A double-release set: The first disc “Haida-Raven” is set for release on July 24, 2019 is different in every way, in that it is an electronic music piece that is grand and panoramic in scale which combines high-technology with native and acoustic instruments to paint scenes that are extremely organic in nature.

Disc 1 – Haida-Raven

UPC: 194616880054
Release Date: July 24, 2019

The second disc “Haida-Dreamcatcher”, which is set for release on July 24, 2020 is more flowing and is almost orchestral in nature in a way that bathes the listener in a wash of nature and sonic scenery.

Disc 2 – Haida-Dreamcatcher

Over 30 years in the making: It’s hard to believe, but this project originally began in the late 1980’s, just as DAWs (Digital Audio Workstations) were beginning to take hold. The strings on both discs were recorded in a studio direct to ADAT VHS tape! Most of the original tracks were recorded to the Steinberg Nuendo Version 1 DAW at 16/44 (higher samplerates didn’t exist or weren’t in common use at the time). Later, going back to the original MIDI tracks with the original instruments, the tracks were re-recorded at a 24/96 higher-resolution rate. In fact, the title track makes use of both the original vocal track (DMH was in his 30s at the time) and a later track that was re-recorded 35 years later. The tracks doubled so precisely, that they were both combined to create the final vocal take.

An immersive tour-de-force: DMH is a 4X Grammy-nominated artist. Largely, this is due to his unique style production and mixing style that provides a natural and expansive width over the listening stage, which makes for a more natural and open sound. Additionally, the stereo mix makes use of the latest in Ambisonic technology, which actually places certain sounds behind this listener when listening to the stereo mix over either speakers or headphones. Combine these advanced techniques with his style of surround mixing that places the sounds all around the listener in an involving way … and you get a sound that’s extremely unique, engaging and immersive.

David Miles Huber is a 4X Grammy-nominated producer and musician in the electronic dance and surround-sound genres, whose music has sold over the million mark. His dance performance style is energized and balanced out by lush beats and live acoustic instruments that combine to create a “Zen-meets-Tech Experience”. His latest music and collaborations can be heard at www.davidmileshuber.com.

DMH has performed all over the US and Central Europe using his in-studio tools (Steinberg Nuendo), on-stage performance tools (Ableton Live) and wireless iPad controller (zero-debug Touchable3). It’s been said that he plays a “mean computer”, iPad, MIDI toys, ethnic flutes, vocals and any kind of percussion he can get his hands on.

A testament to a culture:

Although the Pacific Northwest Territories is home to Microsoft, Starbucks, Amazon, Boeing and a countless list of tech corporations … it is also home to countless beauty in the form of mountain ranges, ocean inlets, forest land and indigenous peoples. Although, not part of the mainstream of the land, the influence the cultures that have preceded us continue the art and general outlook of the Pacific Northwest Territories as a spiritual place that must be honored an preserved.

DMH has had the honor of knowing one of the cornerstones of native heritage in the form of Vi Hilbert, one of the most respected Elders in the Pacific Northwest. Vi (1918 – 2008) has been the subject of several television documentaries, including “Huchoosedah: Traditions of the Heart” from KCTS, Seattle and the BBC, London, England. She had devoted much of her life to the study, promotion and preservation of her childhood language, Lushootseed Salish, and the oral literature and culture of her people. She has transcribed and translated these materials into English. She retired from teaching in 1988, and began storytelling at the insistence of her students. She was frequently invited to tell stories by Native groups, the National Association of Professional Storytellers and other educators at all levels.

Many years ago, Vi invited me to her house, where we set about recording a fable that was near and dear to her heart, Lady Louse. I asked her to read the famous text from Chief Sealth (Seattle), but she refused, saying that this tale was for the white man and did not convey a special meaning for her. So, instead, she told the story of Lady Louse, one who lived her life in isolation and died alone. Personally, I may be the only person who has heard this story more than Vi … and I have my own interpretation on what it means. If you get a chance to listen to the title track of the first disc “Raven” multiple times, you will doubtless come up with your own interpretation.

Vi Hilbert Hall:

In the Fall of 2019, the Vi Hilbert Hall housing development for Seattle University was built. Named after Vi Hilbert, this new student housing community pays homage to the woman who devoted much of her life to keeping the Northwest native tribe of Lushootseed’s culture, language and stories alive. Her passion for sharing knowledge within an environment of constant cultural evolution forged a legacy for what she called “the first people of this land.” Vi Hilbert Hall honors Vi’s spirit and provides us with inspiration as we seek to create a new and vibrant residential community at Seattle University.

A testament to a way of life:

One of the things that most attracted DMH to the Northwest was not only its natural beauty, but its general respect for nature. Although the area is now home to so many newcomers, there still is an overriding respect for the land that can’t be denied. This stems from it’s long-standing religion of the native peoples … “we are part of the land and the land is part of us”. Haida is a celebration of this mutual respect and for helping those new to these philosophies to better understand their connection to the place in which they live.

In fact, DMH is not a religious man at all, choosing not to follow any organized religion. For him, it is indeed the power … the spiritual component of the native cultures of the Pacific NW that makes the most sense to him. The concept that all life has a right to be here, that mankind MUST live in harmony with nature, if, for no other reason than the fact that we are not masters of our universe (as most organized religions would have us believe), but passengers on this great, blue, living ball. We exist by the grace of nature … nothing more. We are at the whim of the balance of nature and her elements and are merely passengers in this planet by the grace of the universe.

A technologically-unique project:

Musically, this lush project combines electronic compositions (which are often made up of originally-recorded samples) with the soothing sounds of nature, live instrumentation (including live string orchestration and male choir) and vocals. Technically, this project has the advantage of being mixed as an immersive Ambeo stereo mix as well as in discrete 5.1 immersive surround sound.

The Ambeo mix was made with the help of Sennheiser’s Orbit plugin, which emulates the binaural characteristics of the Neumann Fritz Kunstkopf, allowing the listener to hear certain tracks (usually those containing high-frrequencies) to be panned at various locations in the 360 deg field. In the case of Haida, the Orbit was used on tracks that best lent itself to panning in the rear, behind the listener (usually in the 130 deg rear L/R stereo panned position). The truly amazing part about Orbit is that the rear panning actually translates not just over headphones, but over stereo speakers as well … a true bonus!

When it comes to the 5.1 discrete (speaker) mix, DMH is true to his Grammy-nominated form, in that he makes use of all of the speakers to envelope the listener in the surround field. All if the speakers are put to use to create a sense of energy, immersion and fun.

Vocals for “Raven”

When working on Haida (which has been in the works for over 30 years … my best guess is that the original vocals for the title track “raven” were recorded around 1992). Recently, however, I went about the task of re-recording the main vocal line at a higher samplerate (24/96), with newer equipment. The question being how would DMH’s voice would change. Well, the amazing part is that his voice pretty much matched the original style and timings of his much younger self … so much so that the original and new tracks were both used as a double-tracked vocal.In the end, the original track had more emotion and best follows the intention of the song, but the doubled track adds to the size and breadth of the track. Notice that the vocal mic is stereo … this is the way DMH works, the use of a stereo mic (usually in an X/Y arrangement) add to the overall spaciousness of the recorded track.

Piano Story

The piano part for disc one “Haida – Raven” was originally written in MIDI and then played into a Yamaha Disclavier. The piano was recorded to DAW in DMH’s standard reamp miking style (close miking, 2M semi-distant XY and 4M Blumlein room mic pair), creating a sound that is rich and full in both stereo and surround.

Strings

The strings were also recorded at Glenn Sound in Seattle, using 10 string players. It was graciously orchestrated by Mike Matesky and was recorded to Adat tape (yes, they were recorded that long ago).

Norwegian men’s chorus intro

One day, when I was in yoga class, the background music was an OHHHMMM track that was in the right key to the intro to Haida-Raven. I thought, “perfect” this would work well as a background to the intro. I then realized that my buddy Morten Lndberg of 2L in Norway will often work with choirs, so I asked him if he could contribute to the project. The result is the addition of the StudenterSangForeningen (The Norwegian Student Choral Society, the official male choir at the University of Oslo) to the project. Their world-class choral music can be enjoyed on their many album projects, as well as on Spotify. Above, are the pics from the 9.1 vocalization session, which was recorded in 9.1 auro3D sound in a church in Norway.

Emiliano helped to lay down several electric guitar tracks at Sonic City Studios in Amsterdam. As always, it was lots of fun and added more of an acoustic element to the tracks.

Re-amping

My buddies at Sonic City Studios in Amsterdam helped me out by doing a reamp from tracks that were recorded in Seattle and Vancouver. Thanks guys for the helpful and slightly corny video.

5.1 surround mix

Once the stereo mix was done, it was time to finally take on the 5.1 mixes. After a bit of deliberation, I decided to mix Raven in 5.1 and not 7.1. This was for purely practical reasons. Anyone who knows me knows that I mix my projects using all of the speakers in the soundscape and not just a bit in the center and reverb in the rear. Since the final mixes were to be delivered in discrete 24/96 FLAC form, if I would’ve done a 7.1 mix, people who were listening to it over a 5.1 system would be missing the two side channels. For me, this was unacceptable … so a 5.1 mix it was!

My main speaker set are PMC AML2’s in 5.1 … They’re amazing speakers, however, for years I’ve been fighting what I thought was a lack of hi-end in the front speaker set. Turns out, it wasn’t a lack of highs … it was a lack of low-end that caused me to have to compensate by boosting the highs. Basically, I was fighting the wrong end (try to be aware of this possibility in your system … these sonic lies can really throw you off.

Soooooo … I knew that my buddy Elliot Scheiner has mix a lot of Grammy winning projects on the JBL 306p speakers (which happen to cost around $100 each these days). So I bought a pair and placed them on my mixing desk just under the PMCs. Mixing Haida (Raven) using the JBL’s was a breeze and seemed to fix the low-end cut problem (and thus the need to over compensate in the highs. This led me to insert the JBL’s into the 5.1 chain. At this point, a unique approach had to be taken … turns out that Steinberg offers up an easy solution.

This answer came in the form of a plug-in from Steinberg that lets you insert the plug-in into the monitor output chain to control the level and delay compensation that lets you time-align the speakers sets. I say set because Nuendo let me setup a 5.1 monitor bus for the upper speakers (as per normal), but also let’s me create a second 5.1 setup that inserts the JBL L/Rs instead of the PMC L/Rs. By time delaying the JBLs (that are 50cm closer than the PMCs, the mixstage came into clear focus and I was able to get a really good 5.1 balance mix.

Sales Track Record…

David Miles Huber (www.davidmileshuber.com and www.modrec.com) is widely acclaimed in the recording industry as a professional musician, engineer, author, university professor and guest lecturer.

1. His most prominent book, Modern Recording Techniques, has been an industry standard text worldwide for over 16 years and has sold hundreds of thousands of copies (the 2nd largest sales figure for any book in the field of pro-audio).

2. His relaxational series “RELAXATION & MEDITATION WITH MUSIC & NATURE” (two – 5 CD sets), has been so enormously successful for Laserlight (Delta Music, Los Angeles) that the relaxational series continues to this day. Sales on these popular 5 disc sets have exceeded the one million-copy mark and have launched relaxational music into the market-mainstream.

production credits:

David Miles Huber: (producer/artist – seattle/berlin/Conway), computer/vocals/ethno flutes/perc
David Miles Huber: (ableton live and nuendo production – seattle/berlin)
Emiliano Caballero Fraccaroli: (european assistant and mastering)
Produced and recorded in Seattle & Berlin
Reamp and electric guitar sessions recorded at Sonic City Studios, Amsterdam by:
Daniel Wullems, Theo Dorey
Original basic tracks recorded at Voyager Recordings, Seattle (voyagerrecordings.com)
Yamaha Disclavier recorded at Turtle Recording Studios, White Rock, BC, Canada by Larry Anchell
Lyrics: Jack Strubbe
Lushootseed Salish Rant & “Lady Louse Story” performed by Vi Hilbert (Northwest elder & storyteller)
Drums: LARedd (Berlin)
Intro vocal drone: Den Norske Studentersanforeningen (The official male choir of the University of Oslo)
Intro vocal drone recorded by Morten Lindgerg in Norway (2L.no)
String Orchestration: Mike Matesky
String Contracting: Mike Matesky
String Session Studio: Glenn Sound, Seattle
Strings: Laurie Wells, Jean Wells Yablonski, Micheal Scott, Mike Walton, Rebecca Evans, William Boyd, Margaret Brennand, Karyn Sorensen, Ingrid Fredrickson and Andrea Lersigni
Electric Guitar: Emiliano Caballero Fraccaroli
Pro Tools string transfer: Scott Colburn; Gravelvoice Studios, Seattle
Bass Saxophone: Paul Woltz

Special Thanks:

Daniel Eric Butler (my husband, partner and best friend)
nhow Hotel, Dominik Trampf and the folks at nhow Soundfloor, Berlin
Everyone at Galaxy Studios, Mol, Belgium
Everyone at Sonic City Studios, Amsterdam
Steinberg Media Technologies Gmbh (studio DAW – Nuendo)
Ableton AG (performance DAW – Live)
Universal Audio Inc. (powered DAW audio plug-ins)
PMC Limited (professional studio monitors)
Steven Slate Audio Inc. (touch video monitors)
Zerodebug (TouchAble performance/studio application for the iPad)

Sounds like: Well, it doesn’t really sound like anyone or anything else. That’s its strength … but it does have the epic and daring feel of Deep Forest, Enigma or Jean Michel Jarre.

tag keywords: David Miles Huber, electronic music, Bandcamp, IDM, uptempo, downtempo, chill, grammy, grammy nominated, modern recording techniques, immersive, surround flac, surround, flac, 5.1, gamers, home theater,


01-Haida-Raven-Scotchbroom

story:
This song is about a man’s taking time out from his life to commune with nature. Laying on a summer’s day on the ground taking in all that is around him. The plants and wildlife that surrounds him arouse his spirits, allowing him to drink in all that is life both around and within him. To me, this song has always been reminiscent of deception pass (wiki, video) at the gateway to the islands of Northwest Washington.

Tech:
The intro to this song is literally about 5 minutes long. Originally, it was simply an evolving synth pad (sustained, underlying sound) with a solo piano. One day, decades later, I was in my yoga class and heard a b minor ohmmmm that would fit perfectly under the pad. I contacted a good buddy (multi-Grammy-nominated producer Morten Lindberg of 2L) in Norway to see if he had access to a male Norwegian choir. It just so happened that the next week, he was going to be working with the ????? choir … who kindly agreed to do a continuous 5 minute b minor vocalization that could sit under the synth … and this is what you hear.

In the middle of the intro, you will hear what to me sounds like jets doing skydives. This was literally a sound design file that I created on one of the earliest Digital Audio Workstations (DAWs) ever. I think it was a super early Roland device (that I kept breaking) … this was in the early 1980’s)
It’s interesting to note that the lead vocals (me) were actually double-tracked. My original track was done on 16/44 mono in about 1982 or so. Decades later, in 2018, I set up my MXL Stereo Revelation mic to see if I could do a better take at 24/96 stereo. Turns out, that I recreated the track so perfectly, that it fit with the original track … so I kept them both, as an awesome effect.

storyboard:
00:00:00:00 … drone flying at low level over Deception Pass at slow speed
00:03:12:00 … drone raises in height to reveal overall vista of Deception Pass
00:04:10:00 … fades to handheld steadycam walking through the paths of Deception Pass


02-Haida-Raven-Five Flute

Story: This is a powerful piece that is based on the pulsating poly-rhythms of native drums. The synth bass adds a raw power to the piece, but the part that always gets my heart glowing is the syncopation between the synth and the bass (especially after the guitar break where the bass and two synth tracks interweave with each other. At the end, you’ll hear a haunting vocalization … this is Vi warning up for story on the final track. I took her voice, slowed it down and processed it into a haunting end in the original native language of the Western Washington region.

Tech: Starting off with the background crickets, these were recorded in the desert of Western Washington in the 1990s. The deep drums are a combination of older, personally-sampled native drums from a friend in Seattle, as well as newer Native Instruments drums. The repetitive “chiff” groove came from my older ASR-10 rack, which came with some of the first removable hard disk drives. The voice in the piece came from Vi Hilbert. Before doing the master take of her “Lady Louse” piece that appears on the title track “Raven”, Vi did a warm up rant. Of course, I recorded it and after processing, it became the perfect rant for this piece.

storyboard:
00:00:00:00 … Flying over the Cascade Mountain range, w. augmented visual efx


03-Haida-Raven-Oulachen

Story: To me, this piece conjures up the deep waters that can be found everywhere in the Pacific NW. Vi Hilbert offered to do some simple vocalizations for this piece (actually, she was counting from one to ten).

Tech: The initial evolving pad came from both a hardware version of the Korg Wavestation and it’s more recent (and far easier to use) Wavestation. The drums come from my personal native drum sample collection, which when combined with Vi’s vocalizations become quite a powerful combination. The flute is one of my larger Indonesian flutes (which are far easier to use than native flutes and sound vastly more full.

storyboard:
00:00:00:00 … handheld steadycam traveling through a salmon creek (with Salmon)


04-Haida-Raven-Once in the Place

Story: The lyrics take us way back to a time, when the native peoples lived in harmony with their environment and lived off of the land for subsistence. It hearkens to a closeness to the land that still lay within us, no matter how we try to deny it.

Tech: The background groove again came from the Korg Wavestation. The my vocal track was probably recorded in mono in the early 1990s using a Neumann U87. The drums are my new buddy, LA Redd (my name for Steinberg’s newest drum plug-in) … he always does a better job tahn any live drummer that I’ve found, so far.

storyboard:
00:00:00:00 … possible scenario #1: Walking through the area with the totem poles outside of Ketchikan, AK
00:00:00:00 … possible scenario #2:


05-Haida-Raven-Paraland

Story: Paraland conjures up the grandeur of the desert territories east of the Cascade Mountains (yes there are deserts in Eastern Washington and British Columbia). The largest waterfall ever on Earth was in Eastern Washington tens of thousands of years ago, the land that was forged from this event is something that would never be forgotten.

Tech: The basic “clap” track is provided by the original Alesis SR16 drum machine. The deep bell track is a sampled recording of a large 3′ x 8″ outdoor wind bell that was cut from a gas cylinder. The recording was pitched down to bring the harmonics down into the musical range to create an aerie bell sound.

storyboard:
00:00:00:00 … possible scenario #1: drone flying over Columbia River Gorge and desert areas of Western WA
00:00:00:00 … possible scenario #2:


06-Haida-Raven-Nansimgat

Story: This song is an homage to the water life of the Northwest Territories, particularly that of the killer and humpback whale population. There graceful movement through the waters can still be treasured in our waters.

Tech: The whale and many other samples in this piece came from a vintage ARS-10 sampler.

storyboard:
00:00:00:00 … over/underwater footage in Puget Sound, with visual and animal effects (possibly in the style of Storm Boy)


07-Haida-Raven-Rainsong

Story: The rhythms and deep percussion conjures the dance and feasts of the ancient potlucks, where food was shared among the village and tribal members. Big, powerful and spectacular was the goal of the feast.

Tech:

storyboard:
00:00:00:00 … handheld steadycam traveling through the Ho rainforest on a rainyday (how is this technically possible?)


08-Haida-Raven-Raven

Story:

Tech:

storyboard:
00:00:00:00 … drone flying from the shores of Ocean Shores (or area like this)
00:04:00:00 … drone flies into and through a wooded area
00:06:30:00 … drone flies slowly back into the shore area and flies high
00:07:30:00 … drone heads back down to a low level (which then revers to its original slow speed just before Vi’s talk)
00:10:00:00 … credit roll

Link-01 to modern NW native art
Link-02 to modern NW native art

Storm Boy links

Production Software:

Unity game creation software
Tiltbrush 3D painting

Headgear:

HTC Vive
Playstation VR (Sony)
Oculus Rift

Immersive Headphones/Immersive Software:

360 Dome Projection:

3D Movies:

Info about YouTube 360 …

I thought that it might be fun (possibly throughout the course of the project) to have a video insert capture of both nuendo session/mixer screens running in the rear 180° of the visual field.

**********************************************

360deg and 3D cameras:

Luciccam:

LucidCam: The World’s First Consumer 3D VR Camera
Capture 3D, 180° footage in FULL HD, so you can share the world EXACTLY as you see it.

Lucid Article #1

360deg and 3D playback:

Samsung Gear VR

The 13 Best Budget VR Headsets for iOS and Android in 2017

Contacts:

Ryan Boudinot (CoMotion Labs)
Lacey Leavitt (mechanical dreams)
Ben Harzell

Headset systems:

Sony PlayStation VR
HTC Vive
Oculus Rift
Google Daydream View
Samsung Gear VR

Companies:

Microsoft *
Google * *
Go Pro *
Red Bull *

Production Companies – Seattle *
Production Companies – SF *
Production Companies – Berlin *
Production Companies – Amsterdam *

***** … As a trusted member of the team, I’d ask that you try to playback from the Google Drive and not download. If you do download, “NEVER”, “EVER” give it out in any way, shape or form. Contact DMH and he’ll get it to those who need to know.

reviews … Thanks so much for your valued input

*
**

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GAMmA (the berlin Remix, chill and original versions) was born out of the concept of representing light through music, specifically those aspects of light that are beyond our ability to perceive. Like so many things in life, not all things of beauty can be readily seen by the naked eye. It’s good to take the time to dig deeper to see what’s behind the facade of what lay before us … the inner, unseen radiance that is all around us. Created and produced in Seattle and Berlin by David Miles Huber (www.davidmileshuber.com), this project guides the listener through space and time, engaging the senses in new and immersive ways.

Most of GAMmA was produced and recorded with the help of Steinberg’s Nuendo DAW software, largely using the UAD2 card for effects and Steven Slate’s Raven touch screen controller. The project was initially recorded using only stereo tracks (sometimes up to 80 of them) and produced from the ground-up in stereo (in the past, I’d often produce the project first in 5.1). Within the session, a great deal of sub-grouping was done, as the project was made up of several groupings of software, hardware and live acoustic instruments … I’d definitely recommend the use of grouping (and track coloring) as a way of making the process easier to identify and control.

I also have the good fortune of also being able to live and produce my music in Berlin. My Wonung (apartment) is simple, but amazingly powerful. Don’t let the small size of these speakers fool you, they’re PMCs and are amazingly accurate and my Acer PC laptop doesn’t seem to know the meaning of the phrase “No, I can’t” … no matter what I throw at it, it keeps chugging along.

Once the initial electronic and live instrument tracks were added, we went into London Bridge Studios (Nirvana, 3 Doors Down, Alice In Chains’, Nickelback, etc.) in Seattle, a studio that’s known for its killer drum sound to record drums for the project, using multiple mics as well as distant room mics to add a liveness to the electronic project.

London Bridge Studios is also know for its really sweet Neve 8048 analog console, which added its usual warmth to the drum mix.

15 minutes in the life of recording drums (with John Ewing) for DMH’s GAMmA at London Bridge Studios, Seattle … You’ll notice that as the composer, I had to conduct certain passages for several songs. This’s why I’ll always choose drummers that are also percussionists. It makes all the difference.

DMH joins Scott Winkinson to talk about his latest Bluray Pure Audio Disc “GAMmA”

Once the tracks have been completed, they came back to Berlin, where the tracks were painstakingly programmed in loop form into Ableton’s Live DAW system. This allowed the project to be performed live (both on stage and in the studio). In this case, the “Live” tracks were performed at the 8th-floor studios at nhow Hotel in Berlin, being digitally captured in a way that allowed the performance to be re-inserted back along with the original mix tracks to create a dance mix that lifts the tempo and the spirits.

Veiw of nhow Hotel (left), just off the Spree River in Berlin. Notice how the studio is actually built out “over” the river, offering one of the best views of Berlin anywhere.

The final mix was made by DMH and Emiliano Caballero at galaxy Studios in Mol, Belgium. This world-class studio in the middle of sheep fields in rural Belgium is home to auro Technologies 3D music mixing techniques and advanced immersive audio technologies.

It was quite the interesting process to master this project, but then to continue further and assemble plus do QC (quality control) for the bluray disc proved to be quite the task. In my case, I was pretty much the only person who could’ve done this, as when I found a problem with the mix, I was able to export the song tracks and then assemble them back into the continuous track files. Trust me, it wasn’t easy and generally took a day for each output format.

project info:

Gamma (Berlin Mix)
Uploaded: November 24, 2018
Release date: December 1, 2014

DK UPC: 193666735314

Lumina (Berlin Mix)
Spectra (Berlin Mix)
Ultraviolet (Berlin Mix)
Radiance (Berlin Mix)
Chroma (Berlin Mix)

ISRC: QZES81820332
ISRC: QZES81820333
ISRC: QZES81820334
ISRC: QZES81820335
ISRC: QZES81820336

Song Credits:

Music: David Miles Huber
Engineer: David Miles Huber
Mastering: David Miles Huber and Emiliano Caballero Fraccaroli
Additional engineer: Emiliano Caballero Fraccaroli
Drums: John Ewing
Recording: Drums recorded at London Bridge Studios, Seattle
Recording: Recorded in Seattle/WA/USA and Berlin/Deutschland
Recording: Ableton production and performance by DMH at nhow Hotel/Berlin/Deutchland
Mixing: Mixed in Seattle/WA/USA and at Galaxy Studios/Mol/Belgium

Thank you:
Daniel Eric Butler (my husband, partner and best friend)
nhow Hotel and the folks at Soundfloor, Berlin
Dominik Trampf, Berlin
Everyone at Galaxy Studios, Mol, Belgium
Steinberg Media Technologies Gmbh (studio DAW – Nuendo)
Ableton AG (performance DAW – Live)
Universal Audio Inc. (powered DAW audio plug-ins)
PMC Speakers (professional studio monitors)
Steven Slate Audio Inc. (touch video monitors)
Zerodebug (TouchAble performance/studio application for the iPad)

tag keywords: David Miles Huber, electronic music, Bandcamp, IDM, uptempo, downtempo, chill, grammy, grammy nominated, modern recording techniques, immersive, surround flac, surround, flac, 5.1, gamers, home theater,

Press Releases

CEPro press release: The electronic dance and downtempo music composer David Miles Huber has released a brand new album, “GAMmA” natively mixed in the Auro-3D immersive sound format created by Auro Technologies.
The album, produced and released through the Auro-3D Creative Label, supplies hi-resolution, multi-channel mix versions, including Stereo: The Berlin Remixes, Stereo: The Chill Mixes, 5.1 Surround Version: The Berlin Remixes and the 9.1 Auro-3D: The Original Mixes, which offers a three-dimensional immersive listening experience.

“GAMmA” is described as the expression of light and color through the medium of music.

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Parallax n. – (an apparent change in perception of an object when viewed from a different direction or viewpoint)
Eden n. – (any delightful place or state; a paradise)

The general theme of Parallax Eden can be found above in the dictionary definitions of the words themselves. As a musical work, it seeks to transport the listener to another place. This place can be serene and chilled, thick and sonically lush or it can be energetic and rhythmically driving … depending upon the mix that you’re listening to.

In its beginnings (as with many of DMH’s project’s), Parallax Eden started out as a relaxational piece, which can still be heard in the “Chill Mix Version”. This generally involves nature sounds (that were recorded by DMH himself) with lush synthesizer pads (often from hardware synths), which are combined with live instrumentation to create a soothing ambient space.

The next phase in the process, takes the nature/chill tracks and combines beats, original rhythm tracks, hard- and soft-synths, as well as beats, loops and live instruments to build up tracks that are lush and energizing … but not overly-so. These mid-tempo mixes make up what is known as the “Original Mix Version”.

From a technical standpoint, much of these tracks are made by DMH in his production facility in the Pacific Northwest of the United States, using Steinberg’s Nuendo and Ableton Live as his main DAW software tools of choice.

Once the original mix versions have been completed, these session tracks are then meticulously added to an Abelton Live session, such that if you were to press Play in Live, the original tracks would play the 4 separate stereo “streams” (being made up of the instrumental/vocal tracks and a special mix version of the surround 5.1 mix tracks).

Add to these original session mixes an extra dose of harder-hitting (and yet still melodic) groove loops, soft synths and about anything that can be imagined … and you come up with a series of grooves that can be played and “performed” to the original tracks. These dance tracks are then composed and assembled into the Ableton Live session in Berlin, in a creative musical environment (above is a pic of my smaller Berlin studio setup … home away from home).

Once completed the Live session is ready for performance. This is often done at one of Europe’s top music hotels, the nhow Hotel in Berlin (their main SSL studio is shown in the picture above). These live mixes are then performed live on-stage or in the studio, which then can then be transferred very carefully back into the main studio DAW to become the “Berlin Remixes”.

A Word on Touch Technology

One of the newer aspects in DMH’s life is touch technology, which he embraces with open arms and flying hands. Where to start? … First, all of the computers in the studio(s) make full use of touch screens. This allows for direct on-screen mixing and software interaction (with the main screen being a full 27” raven touchscreen.

Next is the integration of the iPad into the studio. During production, the iPad acts as a MIDI device, providing software synths, tools and various musical toys that are definitely part of the overall process. However, once the original version of the project has been mixed, the iPad becomes a central part of the production process through the use of Touchable, a touch, wireless control interface to Ableton Live that allows him to compose, perform and experiment in the studio and live on-stage.

Once the compositions are done, the mixing process begins at DMH’s studio facilities in both 2.0 (stereo) and 5.1 (surround sound). With the use of Steinberg’s Nuendo and various effects plug-ins (most notably from Universal Audio, DMH then crafts the mixes into their final musical form. Moving further, DMH then visits to his other musical family, Galaxy Studios in Mol, Belgium. Here, DMH goes about the task of mixing in 9.1 Auro3D® for the final release product. In this case, the Auro3D® mix is made up of a full 5.1 mix on the ground and an extra set of quad speakers in the air, giving an expansive sense of height to the mix.

The final Bluray Disc product is unique (probably the first of its kind) in that it contains not only several mix formats, it also includes several mix and remix music versions. Just choose your color on the Bluray remote control…

YELLOW (Berlin 2.0 Remix) This is not a “fold-down”, but a separate stereo mix that has been crafted with tender loving care.
GREEN (Chill 2.0 Mix) Take away the dynamic dance tracks and you are left with underlying chill tracks that are the foundation of these songs.
RED (Berlin 5.1 Remix) The surround mix is where the action is. Quite literally, the l, r, c, lfe, ls, rs soundfield envelopes the listener from all speakers to create an immersive 5.1 experience.
BLUE (Original 9.1 mix) This Auro-3D® mix adds an extra 4 channels of overhead height information, for a total of 9.1 channels!

In addition to being unique and bold in format and mix options, these mixes have been mixed quite boldly … the surround mixes literally surround you with instruments and effects, placing you in the middle of it all. Bold and innovative enough that it won a Grammy nomination.

Parallax Eden can be purchased here:
Auro3D Creative Bluray Edition
Stereo mix download versions

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parallax eden (the berlin remixes) is a dance remix of the Grammy-nominated parallax eden project that transports the listener to a place that’s both peaceful and energizing. It’s a unique project that’ll groove you in unique and contemplative ways.

project info:

Electronic
Electronica/Downtempo
Alternative

Parallax Eden (Berlin Mix)
DK UPC: 193537113883
Uploaded: November 2, 2018
Release date: July 1, 2010

DK UPC: 840091706692

Innerbase (Berlin Mix)
Renaissance (Berlin Mix)
Serenitatis (Berlin Mix)
Lunacy (Berlin Mix)
Tranquility (Berlin Mix)

ISRC: QZES61869124
ISRC: QZES61869125
ISRC: QZES61869126
ISRC: QZES61869127
ISRC: QZES61869128

Song Credits:

Music: David Miles Huber
Engineer: David Miles Huber
Mastering: David Miles Huber and Emiliano Caballero Fraccaroli
Additional engineer: Emiliano Caballero Fraccaroli
Additional engineer: Brux Callison
Additional engineer: Sterling Huber
Recording: Recorded in Seattle/WA/USA and Berlin/Deutschland
Recording: Ableton production and performance by DMH at nhow Hotel/Berlin/Deutchland
Mixing: Mixed in Seattle/WA/USA and at Galaxy Studios/Mol/Belgium
lunar landing dialog courtesy of the national aeronautics and space administration

Thank you:

Daniel Eric Butler (my husband, partner and best friend)
nhow Hotel and the folks at Soundfloor, Berlin
Dominik Trampf, Berlin
Everyone at Galaxy Studios, Mol, Belgium
Steinberg Media Technologies Gmbh (studio DAW – Nuendo)
Ableton AG (performance DAW – Live)
Universal Audio Inc. (powered DAW audio plug-ins)
PMC Speakers (professional studio monitors)
Steven Slate Audio Inc. (touch video monitors)
Zerodebug (TouchAble performance/studio application for the iPad)

tag keywords: David Miles Huber, electronic music, Bandcamp, IDM, uptempo, downtempo, chill, grammy, grammy nominated, modern recording techniques, immersive, surround flac, surround, flac, 5.1, gamers, home theater,

Production notes:

So, I laid down acoustic drums over the groove/synth/loop drums on several of my upcoming projects. If there’s anything I’ve learned, it’s “stay clear of cymbals and even hi-hats when laying down the tracks … Like Zeph Sowers (below) says … they cloud and overpower an electronic mix … it’s just plain bad! Fortunately, I pretty much figured it out after the first song (which I miraculously saved my dubbing in drums from another song without cymbals and hat). Here’s what Zeph has to say …

Engineer Zeph Sowers on layering electronic and acoustic drum sounds

“If the predominant drums are electronic, then you don’t want your live kick drum to sound too fat on the bottom, so you may want to cut out some of those frequencies. Just so it’s more felt rather than being the main thing heard. And you don’t always need cymbals in an electronic drum set sound. TVOTR don’t use cymbals. They take up too much space in the mix. As soon as you add cymbals they cloud and color everything and take a lot of space. You want to leave space in that frequency range for other things. Cymbals fight too much for us. If we do cymbals beyond the hi-hat, we might overdub a ride or add a slowed down crash cymbal sample. When blending electronic and acoustic drums, you have to make sure all the drums are hitting together, if not, you will get flamming and lose the impact of both sets.”

Parallax Eden Bluray review:

As mentioned in its description, this release comes in three flavours, with four listening options (stereo Chill, stereo Berlin remix. 5.1 Berlin remix and 9.1 Auro 3D* Original mix). Last night I listened to the 5.1 Berlin mix and I was hooked within 30 seconds. So much so in fact, I got up, switched the lights off and went to that special place where there is no spoon i.e. the moment. DMH has been nominated for 4 separate Grammy’s for best multichannel mix, and if the rest of his music is like this, then goodness knows why he hasn’t won at least once because the surround mix is superb!

I then played the stereo Chill mix, which is more or less the same album, but without the uptempo grooves and I loved it just as much. I should add this album is perfect for late night listening because even the full-fat version is a long way away from what could be called club rave tempo; I dare say, it’s probably best described as chilltronica.

If you like electronic music and like to relax late at night, this is the one to buy…especially if you have a surround sound setup!

* If the appropriate hardware isn’t in place, the BDA outputs a 5.1 fold-down version of the 9.1 mix to make it compatible, so you don’t need an Auro 3D capable AVR to hear the Original mix in surround sound; albeit, in 5.1 instead of 9.1 surround sound.

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Chamberland encompasses many facets… at its heart, it is an electronic project whose songs invoke color, emotion and attitude that evolves throughout the piece in an innovative and evocative way. Created and produced in Seattle and Berlin by 4X Grammy nominee David Miles Huber, Chamberland is a tour-de-force in immersive electronic music.

Chamberland: the berlin remixes (CBR) is made up of eight songs. Each song represents a color (emerald, cobalt, bronze, amber, magenta, violet, crimson and opal).


Making of Parallax Eden (chill mix) 01: How I got started


Making of Parallax Eden (chill mix) 02: On surround


Making of Parallax Eden (chill mix) 03: How I made the music (at that time in my life)


Making of Parallax Eden (chill mix) 04: Making the videos


Making of Parallax Eden (chill mix) 05: Credits and thanks (at that time in my life)

click here to read about the DMH production process

project info:

Electronic
Chill Out
New Age

Chamberland (Chill Mix)
Uploaded: October 30, 2018
Release date: September 23, 2014

DK UPC: 193537214917

Emerald (Chill Mix)
Cobalt (Chill Mix)
Bronze (Chill Mix)
Amber (Chill Mix)
Magenta (Chill Mix)
Violet (Chill Mix)
Crimson (Chill Mix)
Opal (Chill Mix)

ISRC: QZES61849361
ISRC: QZES61849362
ISRC: QZES61849363
ISRC: QZES61849364
ISRC: QZES61849365
ISRC: QZES61849366
ISRC: QZES61849367
ISRC: QZES61849368

Song Credits:

Music: David Miles Huber
Engineer: David Miles Huber
Mastering: David Miles Huber and Emiliano Caballero Fraccaroli
Additional engineer: Emiliano Caballero Fraccaroli
Additional engineer: Brux Callison
Recording: Recorded in Seattle/WA/USA and Berlin/Deutschland
Guitar: Ari Joshua
Guitar: recorded at Youngtown Cultural Arts Center, Seattle/WA/USA
Recording: MIDI grand piano: recorded at glenn sound studios/Seattle/USA
Mixing: Mixed in Seattle/WA/USA and at Galaxy Studios/Mol/Belgium
Shout out: lunar landing dialog courtesy of the national aeronautics and space administration

Thank you:
Daniel Eric Butler (my husband, partner and best friend)
nhow Hotel and the folks at Soundfloor, Berlin
Dominik Trampf, Berlin
Everyone at Galaxy Studios, Mol, Belgium
Steinberg Media Technologies Gmbh (studio DAW – Nuendo)
Ableton AG (performance DAW – Live)
Universal Audio Inc. (powered DAW audio plug-ins)
PMC Speakers (professional studio monitors)
Steven Slate Audio Inc. (touch video monitors)
Zerodebug (TouchAble performance/studio application for the iPad)

tag keywords: David Miles Huber, electronic music, Bandcamp, IDM, uptempo, downtempo, chill, grammy, grammy nominated, modern recording techniques, immersive, surround flac, surround, flac, 5.1, gamers, home theater,

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As the public is slowly being educated about the options for downloading music files i HD (High Definition), many mis-understandings, FUD (fear, uncertainty and doubt) and downright bit-war snoberies are beginning to surface.

Bigger, faster, higher and more-expensive is “always right” … right? Well, not always. The truth is that there are sometimes extenuating circumstances that call for various choices to work at various samplerates. Let me offer myself up as a sacrificial lamb to highlight some of the reasons why “bigger, faster, more” just might not always be the best choice.
My name is David Miles Huber (www.davidmileshuber.com) … I’m a 3X Grammy-nominated producer/artist in the electronic music genre. I play “a mean computer”, that’s my instrument of choice … and I’ve been doing it for decades. As such, I’ve been sampling hardware instruments, soft-synths, real instruments and adding recorded tracks to my projects for over 20 years. These self-made and commercially-available sounds have been carefully hand-forged into loops that make up my craft … mostly in an era when the 24/96 (or gawd forbid the 24/192) discussion wasn’t even around.

The next part of the discussion revolves around whether to up-sample the current sounds into a “hi-res” (most likely 24/96) project and then record the new material at the higher rates. This is all well and good, except that one of my main live production tools is Ableton Live, running on a laptop. Performing live at 24/96 would most likely introduce added hardship on the hard drive, CPU processing and added signal processing. Thus the performance aspect would probably remain at 24/44. As my European Assistant pointed out to me … these actions of moving back and forth between rates are going to slip me up at some point in time. He said … “It’s about the music, not the science”.

In the end, I had to totally agree with him. When the audio is carefully recorded and crafted using carefully chosen mic techniques, killer converters that sound great, working your butt off using proper recording and production practices … The sound will follow. I’ve know from experience that carefully-crafted 24/44 can easily beat out 24/96 that is less than steller. Add to this, the needs of the production process (with regards to processing power and ease-of-use), and it comes down to these things:

1. Does technology get in the way of the music?
2. How does it sound?
3. Does your chosen bitrate make sense for your production system and style?

If you’re recording live instruments and using your DAW as a tape recorder, then mixing this recording into a final product … fine … recording at a high rate will most often be the best answer. However, if you’re dealing with large number of tracks, live performance constraints, plug-in constraints, electronic production styles and tools … and the answer just might not be so simple. In the end, I would ask you to respect the way in which the artist makes his or her music … judge them on their sound alone and not on the science of the tools that have captured their sound. Quality sound is quality sound … and good music will stand on its own merit, in the end.

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