Adding <<< SPACE >>> to my mixes

The process of creating Chamberland has been an amazing one for me. It has taken me from my home studio – to a super-studio in Belgium – to a super-hotel in Berlin … to performances in both stereo and quad in the US and Europe.

Beyond the intricate, lush sounds and immersive production, one of the more interesting aspects of producing this project has been its sense of “space” … a largeness in the mix that comes from several sources:

1. Stereo miking and stereo sound-sources: Those of you who know me, know that I “only” record stereo tracks. That’s right, even when I’m recording vocals or an instrument, I’ll use two mics or a stereo mic. This adds a huge sense of space to the mix right-off-the-bat, giving a depth to an otherwise one-dimensional source.

2. Stereo room mics: Whenever it’s called for, I’ll record an instrument with 2 stereo mic pairs. For example, on “Magenta”, I recorded Ari Joshua in a large gym with two mics on the electric guitar cabinet and two XY mics out in the hall at a 25 foot distance. Not only does this add a huge sense of space to the overall stereo mix, when it comes time to do the surround mix, the room speakers can be placed in the rear, giving a natural “being there” sound.

The following acoustic guitar pic was taken in the same gym with my late buddy Barbara Buckland (R.I.P.).

3. One of the effects that I’ve been having fun with is the Universal Audio Ocean Way Studios acoustic space plug-in for the UAD2 … it adds such a natural and big sense of space to an electronic mix, that’s it’s just too fun to pass up.

Combining Ocean Way with the actual distant mics, combine to create an electronic project that doesn’t sound dry or sterile … Obviously, I’ve been having fun!

NOTE: See all the project notes at the Chamberland page

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